Browsing all posts in photography 101.

Photo Analysis for Personal Improvement

We typically know, within a few seconds of viewing a photograph, whether we “like” it or not. It’s an automatic assessment, one that speaks to our instincts and our sense of aesthetics. When you’re learning to take great photos, though, it really helps to go through the process of understanding why we like or do […]

The Best Lighting Patterns for Portrait Photo Shoots

This post is written and sponsored by Venture Photography. Portrait photography is highly specific. To be successful, you need great understanding of aesthetics and the right equipment which is why many couples and families turn to professional photographers for their group photo shoots. Proper light is very important for capturing the best facial features and […]

Creative use of second curtain sync

My husband and I frequent a local bar, who last weekend featured a Judas Priest tribute band. We’re both big fans of Priest, so we were enthusiastic to attend. I asked the bar manager beforehand if it would be okay for me to take photos while the band played. Not every band, and not every […]

Review: Speedliter’s Handbook

When learning how to apply off-camera flash to your photography, beginner and intermediate photographers will find Speedliter’s Handbook: Learning to Craft Light with Canon Speedlites by Syl Arena to be an invaluable resource. Though written for Canon speedlite users, the book has advice, tips and tricks that can be applied to any brand of camera […]

Sharp vs. Focused, and Depth of Field

A photo has to be in focus in order to be sharp, but a photo does not have to be sharp in order to be in focus. This photo is sharp (click to see original size): Zoomed in to original size, you can see that every detail of the motorcycle and motorcyclist are very clear, […]

A Study in Leading Lines

The purposeful use of leading lines encourages the viewer’s eyes to travel along a specific path. Test it upon yourself… look at this photo of flowers: The image is pretty and colorful, but does not compel your eyes to fall on any one place or follow any particular aspect. Now look at this photo: The […]

Trust Your Camera

Sometimes it’s okay to trust your camera. We spend a lot of time talking about using aperture priority, or shutter priority, or full manual mode. We teach you how to “take control” of your camera and dictate the outcome of your photographs for yourself. We show you how to compensate for your camera’s perceived weaknesses […]

Exposure Lock in Action

I was in Grand Teton National Park a couple of weeks ago, taking an evening drive. The light lingers for a very long time in Wyoming in the summer; toward the very end of twilight the mood that the fading light generated was just lovely. We paused on a bridge crossing the Snake River and […]

Six Tips to Instantly Improve Your Landscape Photography

1. For heaven’s sake, don’t center everything! The rule of thirds is your friend, and even stretching the rule of thirds to a more extreme degree can make a shot very intersting. (I call it the rule of sixths, and no that has no scientific merit whatsoever, I just thought I was being clever). Which […]

The Importance of Perspective

How large do you suppose these rocks are? Could you pick them up in your hand? Step over them? Are they the size of your bed? Your car? Your house? Well, now take a look at this photo: That’s me up there! Here’s another angle. Here’s another one. Pretty mountain stream? Or enormous Upper Falls […]