Browsing all posts in photography tips.

The Camera That’s With You

You have probably heard of the philosophy that the best camera is “the one you have with you.” The phrase was originally used by Chase Jarvis in his book The Best Camera Is The One That’s With You: iPhone Photography. The concept – so simple and yet somehow so profound – is being embraced by […]

The First Three Things to Learn in Lightroom

NOTE: This article pertains to Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4. Version 5 is also available, and the steps will be similar though may not match exactly. Lightroom is a very powerful tool for viewing, organizing, retouching and sharing your photos. At first glance, it may seem that the program is too complex to be mastered quickly. […]

10 Things I Learned from Jay Maisel

It’s finally September, and psychologically the end of summer. The triple-digit heat still holds Arizona in its grip, though, so I still spend my days inside, in air-conditioned comfort. Luckily for me I have a subscription to Kelby Training. Just because I can’t physically wander the streets, camera in hand, doesn’t mean that I can’t […]

Off-roading with my camera

(Click on photos to see larger versions.) Most weekends my husband and I head out to explore the many off-road trails that Arizona has to offer. We have seen hundreds of stunning sights from the safety and comfort of our Jeep. As our skills and confidence have grown, we have tackled more and more challenging […]

Tips for Using a Soft Focus Filter

(click any image to enlarge) Soft focus effects can be achieved fairly easily in post-processing software programs such as Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4 or Adobe Photoshop CS6. However, I encourage you to practice achieving the look you want straight out of the camera. To that end, I recommend that you consider trying out a soft […]

Create an Ethereal Landscape

Creating a “soft glamour glow” is a popular Photoshop technique for portraiture. When applied to a landscape photograph, the same technique adds a sense of the ethereal and the fanciful. For this tutorial I will be using Adobe Photoshop CS6. Here is the original photograph, taken in the red mountains of Sedona, Arizona. (Click any […]

Be Flexible

Before we get to the article, I wanted to remind you all that today is the last day to enter our photo contest! Please submit a single photograph that best depicts the drama that can be achieved with a single flash. Post your photo on our Facebook Page, Google+ Community, or Flickr Group Discussion (please […]

Sharp vs. Focused, and Depth of Field

A photo has to be in focus in order to be sharp, but a photo does not have to be sharp in order to be in focus. This photo is sharp (click to see original size): Zoomed in to original size, you can see that every detail of the motorcycle and motorcyclist are very clear, […]

Focus Stacking in Landscape Photography

The creative use of depth of field is one of the first things we learn as photographers. To some it was an epiphany to learn that we can choose which aspects of our image are in focus – from the smallest portion to the largest landscape. We know that if we choose a small aperture, […]

A Study in Leading Lines

The purposeful use of leading lines encourages the viewer’s eyes to travel along a specific path. Test it upon yourself… look at this photo of flowers: The image is pretty and colorful, but does not compel your eyes to fall on any one place or follow any particular aspect. Now look at this photo: The […]