Browsing all posts in shooting.

Photographer in the News: So touching will make you teary

The article I found this morning for this post really touched me.  Here is the quick story: “Bartone, a 52-year-old professional photographer from Beechview, is hoping to lift the spirits of soon-to-be deployed military personnel and their loved ones or the families of those serving in Iraq or Afghanistan by taking their photographs and giving […]

Crummy Weather Photography

February and March are crummy weather months in much of the country.  Certainly in NY – it’s one crummy, cold, dreary, nasty, cold, snowy, cold, muddy mess of a day after another.  So I did a shoot yesterday to demonstrate the different ways to adjust your settings and equipment to get better shots on crummy […]

Camera Weight Watchers

CC Photo by gary knight When Lisa and I first started shooting on location portraits and engagement sessions, we would always lug around most of our equipment. We wanted to be ready for whatever situation arose. Each of us would be carrying two camera bodies, 3 lenses, 2 flash units, triggers, extra batteries for both […]

An Easier Way To Keeping Your Eyes Open

Do you shoot with your right eye? Do you keep the other eye closed? CC Photo by Hamed Saber We published an article last November 2007 that discusses the benefits of keeping both eyes open while looking through a viewfinder. If you’re like most photographers then you probably use your right eye to look through […]

Photography in the News: Groundhogs

Today is Groundhogs Day.  Not exactly a holiday – it doesn’t get me out of work and unfortunately it’s not going to make the gray of winter move along faster.  In a few minutes some well dressed man with a top hat will reach his hand into the hole of a Groundhog pull him out […]

When Reflections Work.

Working with reflections so that they add to the photo is a difficult thing to do.  There are a whole series of ways that reflections do not work.  For example when you take a reflection of someone and in the reflection you can see up the persons nose….like some senior pictures that I’ve seen…like one […]

Spatial Relationships and Distortion

We all know that the main difference between a wide angle lens and a telephoto lens is the angle of view. Compared to a wide angle lens, telephoto lenses have a much smaller or tighter field of view which means that it can only capture a small part of a scene. Another difference between the […]

Studying Light in Photography

We’ve recently started publishing articles concerning light and how to control it. Most beginners would think that studying light is reserved for professionals but this definitely isn’t the case. Light is the most important topic in photography because, simply put, if there’s no light then there’s no photo. In this article we will discuss the […]

5 Ways to Shoot Autumn Leaves

CC Photo by Nicholas BelowAutumn is all about color and leaves. Red, orange and yellow suddenly becomes the predominant color of nature instead of the usual green. What you need to know is that red, orange and yellow are advancing colors. This means that if you look at different colored objects at a same distance […]

Hyperfocal Distance: Maximizing Your Depth of Field

In our article on Macro Photography, we discussed how shallow depth of field can be used to isolate your subject. This, however, is useless in landscape photography since you will need most, if not everything, in focus. To do this, you will need to learn how to maximize your depth of field and learn something […]